Monday

I Don't Understand, Je Ne Comprends Pas, No Entiendo

It is spring now, and I thought the quarrel with that wanna-be, silhouette expert from Texas, was over and done with. But I guess not, as she keeps at it on her little blog. She keeps picking sandgrain tidbits of nothing and tries to make something out of it. Why is she making a fool of herself?  I don't understand.

As for myself, I need no introduction, as my nine years of blogging speaks for itself. I write about antique silhouettes for fun and pass on new information about them to help collectors and dealers; it is one of my hobbies. She sells silhouettes for a living, I don't. So my writings are unbiased.

That DEALER from Texas:

First, she writes very little on the subject (her silhouette artists bio is a laugh...she took them straight out of reference books without giving them any credits). Second, she is unable to tell fakes and reproductions from genuine 19th century silhouettes. Third, most of what she knows were learned by reading my blogs. Fourth, she still bases her little opinions on an outdated 1928 book by Alice van Leer Carrick. (By the way, Carrick's book is excellent, but my nine years of writing takes it way beyond her investigation. Carrick started it, and I am continuing it.)

So, what is this Texas dealer? She is a pothole, a menace for all to avoid. If some of you fall into it, this pothole gets bigger and bigger. Save costly alignment and go around that nuisance. What a wanna-be is what a wanna-be does. Spring is finally here. Get over it and move on!

Check out my other antique silhouettes sites: Our latest Blog (largest)
"                                                                "   : Second Newest (not so large)

Tuesday





20th Century Chapman Silhouette
 
This Chapman is NOT the early 19th century Moses Chapman's work. It is 20th century. I have never seen an embossed (signed) 19th century Chapman in my life. Has anyone seen one? I have never even heard of one. In addition, 19th century cutters NEVER cut profiles this way.
 
She and I exchanged our views on my blogs about this subject. Check the blog post dated August, 24, 2010 and others for related content. There she writes:
 
"And, having had a silhouette with the “Chapman Siccauit” stamp and also being quite knowledgeable and experience with early silhouettes, I am quite certain that the stamp was used by a 19th century silhouettist. You have not convinced me to discount the “Chapman Sicciaut” stamp in all cases."
 
Her statement above is pure xxxx: "quite knowledgeable and experience with early silhouettes"? If any of the readers truly believe this silhouette is from the early 1800s feel free to join her club. At one time, I, too, believed it was from the 19th century. As soon as I found out it was NOT a 19thc work, I revised me views, wrote about it, and even sold it as a 20th century silhouette. I lost quite a bit on that deal. That's what I got from being stupid and having wishful thoughts.


 




Henry Williams Silhouette

I've covered plenty about this sort of 20th century silhouettes. These silhouettes are NOT 19th century. For a lot more about these fake WILLIAMS embossing, read my past posts. Originally from Hindman auction, Oct., 4, 2009, $400. It now  belongs to...unless she already sold it.

 
Three Styles of William Bache Silhouettes

 He worked in three disctinct styles: plain hollow-cut, hollow-cut with embellishment on black backing paper, fully painted. There are many fakes of all three styles out there. His authentic embossing stamp is very well made (see photo). It measures 21mm from one point to another. Fake stamps are quite crude and sizes differ widely. So if you don't know what to look for with his silhouettes, at least know what an authentic stamp measures and looks like. Bache had a tendency to stamp very close to bustline. So if you see a stamp that is distant from the bustline, you should examine further.

Let me give you another advice on hollow-cut with embellishment on black backing paper style. If you are not sure of the embossment, open the back of the frame. Every fake I examined used a common black construction paper. It is black on both sides. This is not to say that one-sided black paper fake does not exist. It's just I have never seen one. Bache only used his handmade paper, which was black on one side only. I illustrate here two photos of fakes. They look alike, but they are different. Do you know who owns them as genuine examples? They belong to HER. I kid you not, unless she already sold them.
 
I hope the readers were able to learn something new today. This is what we do!